"The mind is a compact, multiply connected thought mass with internal connections of the most intimate kind. It grows continuously as new thought masses enter it, and this is the means by which it continues to develop."

Bernhard Riemann On Psychology and Metaphysics ca. 1860

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Monday, August 17, 2009

Prometheus Rebound

These days there are some pretty savvy global warming researchers. Sometimes I am awestruck. The latest just in is a dandy, indeed. It seems that Zeus is the original environmentalist. Who knew? What do you mean with such blunderbus you ask? I can't make this stuff up, I retort.

"Agricultural methods of early civilizations may have altered global climate, study suggests

Massive burning of forests for agriculture thousands of years ago may have increased atmospheric carbon dioxide enough to alter global climate and usher in a warming trend that continues today, according to a new study that appears online Aug. 17 in the journal Quaternary Science Reviews."

Why does this involve purely mythological figments like Prometheus and Zeus? Stay with me here. Prometheus was worshiped as one of the older Titanic gods that rivaled Zeus. His sin was giving mankind fire. You see his brother Epimetheus must have been a fraud or have doublecrossed Prometheus. (He was the one who had the gift of foresight.) He should have known that fire would eventually doom mankind through global warming.

Now this puts Christianity in a whole new light. It turns out that all this talk about the meek inheriting the earth is hokum. They are for the big multinational polluters in reality. Bring back Zeus, bring back Gaia. Io Pan, io pan! Yo' mama. Big mama.

1 comment:

  1. Anonymous6:22 AM

    I agree with you that
    Ruddiman is in fact blaming Promethus for global warming.
    Ruddiman's first paper claiming that early settlers in North America
    had created a climate problem by burning wood and he went as far
    as to claim that this burning of wood kept the setlers from suffering
    from the worst cold period of the Little Ice Age. This is treated by
    reasonible climate researchers as a joke and got a really good laugh
    out of it.
    I wrote a box that accompanied an interview with climate Skeptic Tim
    Patterson.
    William F. Ruddiman of the University of Virginia
    argues that man-made global warming began thousands of
    years ago, as a result of the production of CO@i2
    caused by the discovery of agriculture and subsequent
    technological innovations in the practice of farming
    (``The Anthropogenic Greenhouse Era Began Thousands of
    Years Ago,'' {Climatic Change}, December 2003). He
    claims that the other main source of CO@i2 was the
    cutting of forests and burning of wood and peat to
    heat homes in Eurasia and North America, which he
    maintains is why glaciers didn't advance further south
    from the Arctic, as they did in previous glacial
    advances. Ruddiman bases this bizarre hypothesis on
    fraudulent ice core data and computer modeling of the
    extent of deforestation in Europe and North America
    over the past 8,000 years.
    b~~~~Ruddiman is a neo-malthusian and a follower of
    ``population bomb'' hoaxster Paul Ehrlich (see ``Where
    the Global Warming Hoax Was Born,'' {EIR}, June 8,
    2007). Ruddiman repeatedly asserts that man created
    climate problems by developing new technologies which
    caused a slight rise in CO@i2. (The amount of
    emissions was barely above the level of natural
    variation from outgassing from the oceans.)
    b~~~~One might laugh at the notion that early
    Europeans burning wood staved off the worst effects of
    the last ice age--which was the response among most
    scientists to Ruddiman's paper. But his more important
    point is more blood-curdling: that pandemic diseases
    such as the Black Death of the 14th Century cause a
    decrease in CO@i2 and a decrease in temperature. In
    other words, such diseases will reduce the population,
    thereby creating a cooler world.

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