"The mind is a compact, multiply connected thought mass with internal connections of the most intimate kind. It grows continuously as new thought masses enter it, and this is the means by which it continues to develop."

Bernhard Riemann On Psychology and Metaphysics ca. 1860

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Saturday, November 17, 2018

Why the Theory of Everything is Dead on Arrival

If current "free thinkers" would abandon their empiricist prejudices and actually make an attempt to comprehend that which the true founder of modern scientific inquiry, Nicholas of Cusa, pointed to as the principle of subsumed powers, the bootless Quixotic quest for a "theory of everything" would be summarily abandoned. Why? I will explain.

Instead of starting from so-called ab initio first principles of the standard model let us plunge headlong into the seeming inextricable welter of the mechanisms of what some biophysicists are calling the interactome. As I have continuously iterated here in these posts only the Riemannian surface function can be upheld as approaching the possibility of a mathematical model for the multi-dimensional interactions within and among the earth's lithosphere, biosphere and noosphere.

Begin with this fully developed complexity that we unearth through scientific investigation and the irony of the absurdity of a physics modeled upon "atom smashers" comes fully into view. The problem though is the woeful lack of even any attempt at comprehending epistemology by the physics "community" that Schrodinger evinced in What Is Life a century or so ago.

LaRouche put it succinctly some time ago when he quipped that the physics professor propounding the universality of the second law of thermodynamics at the blackboard curiously cannot account for his own existence.

In just one among a myriad of illustrations of what I mean this one posted by Dr. Lieff called the Very Intelligent Protein mTOR I recently came across is very apt. While I may take issue with the author's teleology, at least he is on the right planet.



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