"The mind is a compact, multiply connected thought mass with internal connections of the most intimate kind. It grows continuously as new thought masses enter it, and this is the means by which it continues to develop."

Bernhard Riemann On Psychology and Metaphysics ca. 1860

Today's Elites


Saturday, August 06, 2011

Downgrade Standard and Poor's!

Anyone who believes that Standard and Poors should determine the credit worthiness of the United States is a damnable and sniveling fool. Alexander Hamilton provided the tonic for removing this sovereign Republic from the grasp of a financial oligarchy based in the City of London. His named antagonist in his reports to Congress was none other than Adam Smith. Smith's doctrine that wealth was merely the product of buying and selling to get money, and that mankind must only be concerned with the principle of pleasure and pain and not the consequences of our actions upon the future of humanity is the epitome of a slave's (or rather a subject's) mentality.  For the most part, both sides of the aisle accept (and that unthinkingly and blindly) these tenets of Adam Smith's wretched ideology. The idea that the moneyed interests rule is their unshakable conviction. This is why they cower at the likes of S&P.
The simple fact is that everything decent our nation has accomplished has been based upon the exact opposite principle. We have led the world because we have had a vision that our nation has a mission to uplift mankind and that the purpose of government is precisely to provide for the general welfare of future generations yet unborn. It is well past high time we throw off the shackles of the craven belief that "money rules the world." What is required is that our  citizens exhibit a backbone again and impose a swift end to the control of these financiers by re-enacting FDR's Glass-Steagall. Call or write your Congressman now to support Marcy Kaptur's Glass Steagall Bill H.R.1489 and Maurice Hinchey's Glass-Steagall bill H.R.2451

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